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Friday, January 29, 2016

Canadian Army Facing Serviceability Issues with Fleet


The Canadian Army continues to see limited serviceability rates due to its aging fleets, according to the newly released Department of National Defence Plans and Priorities report. “The Canadian Army assesses its major vehicle and equipment fleet serviceability at 60 percent,” the report pointed out.

According to DND, the Canadian Army tried to sell a number of its surplus Buffalo and Husky vesicles to help with increasing serviceability rates; but were unable to find any buyers. The Canadian Army also owns a third vehicle in the Expedient Route Opening Capability suite; the Cougar, but it has no plans on selling this model.

That issue covers its major vehicle and equipment holdings. “Until replacements fleets are fielded, and in order to minimize the impact on readiness, the Canadian Army is actively prioritizing the usage of its fleets,” the report stated.

Despite on-going issues with aging fleets and the availability of qualified technicians, the Royal Canadian Air Force achieved an overall fleet serviceability rate of 93 percent, the report noted. Parts availability remains a concern for certain fleets, as serviceability levels can only being achieved by taking parts from other aircraft, which increases maintenance requirements, it added.

The Canadian Army Buffalo 


The Buffalo’s extendable arm is stowed in the travelling position.
A Canadian Army Buffalo. Photo: Canadian Army
The Buffalo is the second vehicle in the Expedient Route Opening Capability suite of vehicles and equipment, which support the detection, investigation and disposal of buried improvised explosive devices (IED). IEDs became the weapon of choice against Canadian Armed Forces deployed in Afghanistan.

The Expedient Route Opening Capability (EROC) Team is normally comprised of a section of engineers operating two Huskies, a Buffalo and a Cougar. The Husky is used to detect possible threats, the Buffalo is used to investigate what was detected, and the Cougar transports the Explosive Ordnance Disposal (EOD) Operators and their vast array of tools. These vehicles are based on a proven design that offers a high level of crew protection against explosive blast and ballistic threats.

The Buffalo uses its extendable arm to physically expose the potential target for verification.

The Canadian Army Husky

The pronounced V-shape of the Husky’s hull is designed to deflect blasts from under the vehicle.
A Canadian Army Husky. Photo: Canadian Army
The Husky is the first vehicle in the Expedient Route Opening Capability suite of vehicles and equipment, which support the detection, investigation and disposal of buried improvised explosive devices (IED). IEDs became the weapon of choice against Canadian Armed Forces deployed in Afghanistan.

The Expedient Route Opening Capability (EROC) Team is normally comprised of a section of engineers operating two Huskies, a Buffalo and a Cougar. The Husky is used to detect possible threats, the Buffalo is used to investigate what was detected, and the Cougar transports the Explosive Ordnance Disposal (EOD) Operators and their vast array of tools. These vehicles are based on a proven design that offers a high level of crew protection against explosive blast and ballistic threats.

The Husky possesses a landmine overpass capacity and is mounted with a full-width metal detector and a ground penetrating radar (GPR).